Friday, April 14, 2017

Passover Service

We held a Passover service, kebaktian Paskah on Wednesday at College. It was a hectic day with faculty meeting in the afternoon and preparations for the passover celebrations took several rehearsals. Thankfully despite essay deadlines the students rose to the occasion. We had a first year student carrying the cross in the Simon's cross-bearing enactment accompanied with five tambourine dancers all dressed in red in honour of Christ's shed blood.
With three more songs then came reading of the OT passage about the tenth plague in Exod 12 and the killing of the firstborn except for those with blood on their doorway. The NT that I set came from Matthew 26:1-5, 17-30 and 27:23-50. The readers, both male students did extremely well as I had coached them in advance in an one to one meeting during the day. The preaching was exemplary by a young colleague whose command of the Malay is second to none. Before the Word I conducted the Lord's Supper and how appropriate it was as it happened during a night service on Passover. I chose our three most senior lecturers as fellow celebrants and they distributed the bread and cup to one and all. Only one hiccup as we ran out of cups with red cordial. So the 4 celebrants and the song leader only had bread and when I asked the congregation to raise their cups in honour of Christ's sacrifice we worshipped the Lord in quiet obedience to His Word. My female colleague led intercessory prayers all projected on powerpoint and before the benediction three offering songs were sung, a trio, duet and solo. It was one of the most orderly services we have had and all glory to the Lord. It lasted just over 2 hours and despite a long day I felt greatly edified and as I walked back to my house I looked up the sky and the moon was still full being the 16th day of Nisan two days after the Passover.

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